Bay Area Council Blog

3.19.08

Major Development Goes South

By Matt Regan

After many years and many millions of dollars invested in a proposed development that would have brought up to 25,000 new housing units and as many as 50,000 jobs to the Coyote Valley in the South Bay, a consortium of developers and landowners have decided that enough is enough.

Economic and political realities are to blame for the demise of the ambitious plan to develop a large parcel of land to the west of Highway 101 on the southern boundary of San Jose. The development team have lately been fighting an uphill battle in San Jose City Hall to win support for the project with the majority of Council members nervous about the impact costs of so many new residents in need of city services. Mayor Reed has also voiced these concerns and stipulated that at least 5000 jobs be in place before the first homes are built. This, twinned with the downturn in the housing market, appeared to be the last straw for Coyote Valley.

What is next for the site remains to be seen.

3.11.08

NorCal Coalition Doing Well on Goods Movement

By Michael Cunningham

A coalition the Council has helped lead headed to Sacramento today to support our efforts to win billions for goods movement infrastructure – trucks, railroads, cargo ships, airports, etc. Looks good for the Northern California Coalition proposal; CTC staff recommend all projects for funding (except acquiring ACE right of way). The Council has been working on this issue for two-years now. Given the comments we heard from all parties in Northern and Southern California, it looks like we are on track for a positive outcome on April 9/10 when the Commission acts on staff recommendations

You can read the CTC staff recommendation here:
http://www.catc.ca.gov/programs/TCIF/TCIF_Staff_Recommendations_03102008.pdf

3.10.08

“Out of the Box” ideas that could happen with private partnerships

By Jim Wunderman

I had the honor of meeting today with the Governor and regional representatives from across the state to discuss long-stalled projects that could happen, if the state allowed what are called public private partnerships. They asked the Council to think out of the box for some ideas. Here’s what I presented:

Truck climbing lanes on the 580 Altamont Corridor
The Bay Area enjoys the distinction of having the 2nd worst traffic congestion in the United States. Over the past 15 years, as warehousing and logistics companies have moved out to the Central Valley and the Port of Oakland has expanded, the 580 freeway has become a parking lot of trucks and cars, truly the worst of the worst. Getting trucks off the road could improve safety, traffic congestion, the speed of goods delivery to other parts of the state and country, and air quality. It could be paid for with tolls or fees on private goods movement companies, Prop 1B goods movement funding, state highway funds and federal highway funds.

Fast trains between the Bay Area and Sacramento
The population centers of the Bay Area and Sacramento are rapidly and inexorably merging into one another and it has become standard for commuters to travel between them. The Capitol Corridor rail line is nearly operating at capacity and must compete with an equally increasing amount of freight. A PBI could create a standalone rapid rail line to carry passengers back and forth between the most densely populated areas of the new Northern California megaregion. It could be paid for with passenger fares, fees to rail freight companies to free up the other lines, Prop 1B public transit money, state highway funds and federal highway funds.

A Southern Crossing between the East Bay and the Peninsula
One of the biggest reasons the Bay Area is so afflicted by traffic congestion is the sheer volume of cars that attempt to squeeze onto the Bay Bridge each day, making it either the number 1 or 2 most traveled bridge in the United States, depending on the day. Senator Feinstein and the Bay Area Council have both long pushed for a new bridge to cross the Bay near the Oakland and San Francisco Airports. It would not only remove a huge bulk of traffic in the region, but could connect the regions two major international airports, allowing them to coordinate passenger and freight movement in a way never before possible. The bridge could also accommodate a BART line that would carry millions of passengers each year. Due to the coordination of the airports, the Southern Crossing might also eliminate the need to expand SFO or OAK airports and the resulting Bay fill. The project could be paid for with: tolls; BART fares; contributions from the airports or airlines; Prop 1B goods movement, public transit and highway funds; state highway funds; and, federal highway funds.

3.7.08

BART, the Council, The Governor – Time for a Press Conference

This morning Jim participated in a press conference with the Governor, Senate Pro Tem Perata, Mayor Dellums and others to announce $24 million for the BART transbay tube retrofit. The Council is proud to have such a tight relationship with BART. BART was the first major project of the Bay Area Council in the 1950’s when the Council conceived of the project, drafted the legislation, pushed it through the legislature and then funded the ballot campaign. We have heavily supported its expansion and improvement ever since. Indeed, Jim Wunderman was a co-chair of the BART tube seismic-upgrade campaign in 2004 that raised nearly $1 billion.

2007 Scholars

2007 Bay Area Council Scholars Announced

Congratulations to the 2007 Bay Area Council Scholars! In addition to recognition from the Bay Area Council, each of our scholarship recipients have been acknowledged by Senator Boxer of the United States Senate for their outstanding accomplishments.

The Bay Area Council Scholarship Program has had the benefit of receiving incredible and diverse applicants from every county of the Bay Area. We would like to thank our dedicated Scholarship Committee for their help in selecting the 10 most qualified students from an outstanding pool of applicants.

We are proud to present the 2007 class of Bay Area Council Scholars, another amazing group of students who have demonstrated strong potential to succeed despite the odds, and a passion for giving back to their communities. Click on their names or photos below to learn more about them.

Sara Edith Cendejas
College: Stanford University
Hometown: St. Helena
High School: St. Helena High School
Career Goal: Immigration Attorney
Julie Taeko Gramlich
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Francisco
High School: Lowell High School
Career Goal: Business
Lisa Hong
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: Union City
High School: James Logan High School
Career Goal: Doctor, Nurse, or Nutritionist
Lanikque Howard
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Leandro
High School: Oakland High School
Career Goal: Doctor or Psychologist
Becky Li
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: Oakland
High School: Skyline High
Career Goal: Pediatrician or Pharmacist
Ynez Lizarraga
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: South San Francisco
High School: El Camino High
Career Goal: Teacher
Jose Manjarrez, Jr.
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: Richmond
High School: Richmond High School
Career Goal: Computer Engineer
Peter Moktan
College: University of California, Davis
Hometown: Berkeley
High School: Berkeley High School
Career Goal: Medicine
Katherina Huong Nguyen
College: Stanford University
Hometown: San Jose
High School: Piedmont Hills High School
Career Goal: Attorney, International Relations, Professor
Cesar Sanchez
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: Redwood City
High School: Eastside College Preparatory School
Career Goal: Business Owner
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2006 Bay Area Council Scholars Announced

Congratulations to our first class of Bay Area Council Scholars! In addition to recognition from the Bay Area Council, each of our scholarship recipients have been acknowledged by Senator Boxer of the United States Senate for their outstanding accomplishments.

In our first year, we received student applications from 23 different high schools around the Bay Area, both public and private. We would like to thank our dedicated Scholarship Committee for their help in selecting the 10 most qualified students out of an outstanding pool of applicants.

We are proud to present the 2006 class of Bay Area Council Scholars, an amazing group of students who have each demonstrated strong potential to succeed and a passion for giving back to their communities. Click on their names to learn more about them.

Timothy Cattell
College: University of San Francisco
Hometown: Bolinas
High School: Tamiscal High
Career Goal: Journalist

Tiffany Cotroneo
College: Mills College
Hometown: Hayward
High School: Castro Valley High
Career Goal: Nurse

Maria Gonzalez
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Jose
High School: Silver Creek High
Career Goal: Lawyer

Sephorah Green
College: Santa Clara University
Hometown: Corte Madera
High School: Redwood High
Career Goal: Nonprofit Executive Director

Daniel Ha
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: Oakland
High School: Skyline High
Career Goal: Doctor

Joyce Hsia
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Francisco
High School: George Washington High
Career Goal: Economist

Michael Kudus
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: Alameda
High School: Encinal High
Career Goal: Family Doctor

Tak Lok (Joyce) Lam
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Francisco
High School: Mission High
Career Goal: Social Worker/Writer

Anna Liu
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Francisco
High School: Philip & Sala Burton High
Career Goal: Business

Heather Nelson
College: University of California, Berkeley
Hometown: San Carlos
High School: Carlmont High
Career Goal: Foreign Affairs/International Relations