Bay Area Council Blog: Workforce of the Future Archive

gov housing bill signing

FIRST IMPORTANT STEP IN ADDRESSING CA HOUSING CRISIS

California took an important first step today in addressing its massive housing crisis when Gov. Jerry Brown signed a package of legislation aimed at providing new funding, streamlined local approvals and stronger enforcement of existing housing laws. Bay Area Council CEO Jim Wunderman joined Gov. Brown, legislators and housing advocates from around the state at a signing ceremony in San Francisco’s Hunter’s Point for 15 bills that included a handful for which the Council had advocated. SB 2 (Atkins) creates a $75 real estate transaction fee that is estimated to generate $250 million annually for affordable housing and SB 3 (Beall) authorizes a statewide $4 billion bond measure for housing that is expected to appear on the ballot in 2018. In addition, SB 166 (Skinner) and SB 167 (Skinner) add teeth to existing laws requiring cities to approve new housing. Much more remains to be done to open the pipeline of new housing the state so badly needs and the Council is already turning its attention to the next legislative session. With an annual shortfall of about 80,000 housing units on top of an estimated 2 million unit deficit, California has a long way to go before it closes the gap and begins to make a dent in its affordability problem.

KQED

NEW POLL HIGHLIGHTS URGENCY FOR HOUSING SOLUTIONS

Results of a new statewide poll gave added urgency to the Bay Area Council’s efforts in securing Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature on legislation to address California’s epic housing crisis. The survey by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies found that 25 percent of voters are considering leaving California because of skyrocketing rents and home prices fueled by a massive housing shortage. The poll found that 92 percent of Bay Area voters think that housing affordability is a serious problem, exceeding the 84 percent level statewide. Council CEO Jim Wunderman was a featured guest on KQED Forum on Thursday to talk about the Berkeley poll results and the solutions on which the Council is focused.

The Council is urging Gov. Brown to sign SB 2 (Atkins) and SB 3 (Beall), which would authorize a statewide vote in 2018 on a $4 billion bond measure for affordable housing and a $75 real estate transaction fee to support local housing, respectively. The Council also is urging the Governor’s signature on two bills by Sen. Nancy Skinner (SB 166 and SB 167) that add teeth to existing laws requiring cities to approve housing.

Listen to the KQED Forum segment with Jim Wunderman>>

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COUNCIL WELCOMES BEIJING MAYOR, SIGNS MOU EXPANDING ECONOMIC COOPERATION

The Bay Area Council this week was honored to welcome Beijing Mayor Chen Jining to the Bay Area as he attended a ceremony for the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) that takes a step forward for a possible new Council office in China’s capital city. The visit by Mayor Chen, former President of prestigious Tsinghua University and Chinese Minister of Environmental Protection, and a delegation of top level Chinese economic and innovation officials highlighted the Council’s deep and growing relationships in China as we work to expand bilateral trade and investment. The MOU between the Council, world-famous Zhongguancun Science Park, which serves as Chinese headquarters for such U.S. companies as Google, Oracle and Intel, and Council of Industry and Technology Alliances in Z-Park marked a significant step forward in our work to expand economic connections with Beijing. The MOU calls for exploring the creation of a new think tank, developing a research and development platform and establishing branch offices both here and in Beijing. Council CEO Jim Wunderman joined Wang Chengwen, Vice Chairman of the Council of Industry and Technology Alliances in Z-Park, and Zhai Lixin, Director General of the Administrative Committee of Zhongguancun Science Park, in signing the MOU. To engage in our China initiative, please contact Chief of Global Business Development Del Christensen.

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TAKING OFF: COUNCIL LOOKS TO STRENGTHEN TALENT PIPELINE IN THE AVIATION INDUSTRY

Strengthening talent pipelines from high schools into technical training programs and improving the rate of community college graduates taking certification tests were identified on Monday (9/18) at the second Occupational Council for Aviation Maintenance Technicians (AMTs) as the two most promising solutions for the hiring strain airlines are facing. Airlines in the Bay Area region are facing extremely high levels of attrition due to retirement, and their needs for technical talent are increasing dramatically. Cumulatively, these employers are seeking to fill hundreds of jobs in the region before the end of 2017.  Convening Bay Area Council employer members, including United Airlines and Alaska Airlines, and educators to talk through the often longstanding hurdles preventing companies from hiring local, qualified, and diverse talent has allowed the Workforce of the Future Committee to pinpoint opportunities for improvement, such as community education events that involve high schoolers, their parents, and student career counselors in the case of AMTs. To learn more about how you can engage with the Workforce of the Future Committee on addressing the region’s pressing workforce gaps, contact Senior Vice President of Policy Linda Bidrossian.

affordable housing

LEGISLATURE TAKES FIRST STEP IN ADDRESSING HOUSING CRISIS

The state legislature late Thursday (Sept. 15) took a first step in addressing California’s epic housing crisis by approving a package of bills aimed at providing new funding for affordable housing and easing regulatory hurdles. Two funding bills the Bay Area Council was supporting—SB 2 (Atkins) and SB 3 (Beall)—won passage along with two other bills—SB 166 (Skinner) and SB 167 (Skinner)—that add teeth to existing laws requiring cities to approve new housing. SB 2 creates a $75 real estate transaction fee that is estimated to generate $250 million annually for affordable housing, while SB 3 authorizes a statewide $4 billion bond measure for housing that is expected to appear on the ballot in 2018. The bills, which still need Gov. Brown’s signature, represent a welcome opening salvo against the state’s massive housing shortage and affordability problem, but much more must be done to close an ongoing housing shortfall of 80,000 units a year. To engage in the Council’s housing policy work, please contact Senior Vice President Matt Regan.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Logo

OVER 80% OF COUNCIL MEMBERS OPPOSE RESCINDING DACA

The Bay Area Council joins with many others nationwide that are expressing serious policy concerns about the Trump Administration’s rescinding of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The depth of those concerns were reflected in a survey issued this week of our members, with the majority of 81% indicating “strong opposition” to the President’s overturning of the Obama-era immigration policy, and 13% in favor. Those Bay Area Council members that supported the overturn often stated that they think this matter should be handled by legislation, not an Executive Order, and therefore hope President Trump “forces the hand of Congress” to pass permanent legislation. They also felt DACA was a way “around legal immigration.” Opponents of the President’s move frequently spoke to America being a nation of immigrants, and that the people left in limbo are ” just the sort of people we need in this country: highly motivated, educated and determined to make their mark in America.”

The Trump Administration will delay implementation for six-months giving Congress a window to develop a legislative fix. A large 88% of members support the passing of permanent legislation that would make the policies expressed in DACA permanent, such as the DREAM Act co-sponsored by Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-IL) and Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-SC).

The DACA program was enacted in June 2012 through executive order and provides a level of amnesty to undocumented, law-abiding immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children through a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and eligibility for a work permit if they are in, or have graduated from, high school. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, approximately 800,000 young people – known as DREAMers – have been approved for the program. Specifically, individuals eligible for DACA must have been under the age of 31 when the program was enacted, entered the U.S. before the age of 16, and have continuously lived in the country since June 15, 2007. Many DREAMers have lived in the U.S. longer than the country they were born in.

California is home to over 223,000 DREAMers who now live in fear of deportation. A significant number live in the Bay Area, and many work for our members. “The Bay Area and nation have long depended on global talent,” said Bay Area Council President and CEO Jim Wunderman. “Though the DREAMers may not have been born in America, they grew up here and became colleagues, students, entrepreneurs, neighbors, friends, parents and more. They are the lifeblood keeping our economy and communities competitive, diverse and thriving. Upending hundreds of thousands of young, innocent lives raised and educated here will have deep social, political and economic impacts.” The Council has long advocated for thoughtful, comprehensive immigration reform and urges Congress to reach a fair, bi-partisan legislative solution. We invite interested members to engage in further strategic discussions around federal action on immigration by contacting Senior Advisor George Broder.

DEVELOPING STRONG TALENT PIPELINES TO MEET GROWING WORKFORCE DEMANDS

“Casting a wide net” was agreed upon as a top priority by Bay Area Council member participants at the Workforce of the Future Committee’s third Employer Best Practices Workshop this week (Sept. 6) focused on Talent Pipeline Partnerships. Participants agreed that in order to connect with the talent they need to fill their open jobs, expanded outreach and relationship-building with a wide array of training and education partners would be required on their part. Best practices regarding partnership models, internal organization of pipelines, and long-term investment in future workers bubbled up as key takeaway items. Companies across industries, including utilities, transportation, and banking are facing growing needs for diverse, qualified, and loyal workers and must get creative in their workforce planning strategies. To learn more about how the Bay Area Council is supporting this creativity through our various programs such as the Best Practices Workshop series, please contact Senior Vice President Linda Bidrossian.

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TALKING WORKFORCE, HOUSING & AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES WITH ASSEMBLYMEMBER BERMAN

How California and the Bay Area prepare for rapidly changing workforce needs was a major focus of a conversation today (Aug. 11) that the Bay Area Council’s Government Relations Committee convened with Assemblymember Marc Berman. Aligning higher education curriculum with current and future employer needs is critical to ensuring students entering the workforce have the skills and training they need to compete. As Chair of the Assembly Select Committee on the Master Plan for Higher Education in California, Berman is hosting a series of regional meetings with industry, educators and other stakeholders to update the state’s Higher Education Master Plan, originally written in 1960. The Council has committed to work closely with the Select Committee on this important work.  The discussion also covered the region’s transportation and housing challenges and Berman’s focus on advancing autonomous vehicles technology and testing.

Berman comes from Palo Alto and represents the 24th Assembly District which includes Southern San Mateo and northern Santa Clara counties. He serves on several committees that are important the Council’s policy work, including Transportation; Jobs, Economic Development and the Economy; and Privacy and Consumer Protection. He also chairs the Elections and Redistricting Committee. The Government Relations Committee is led by Co-Chairs Andrew Giacomini, Managing Partner, Hanson Bridgett LLP and Peter Brightbill, Senior Vice President, Wells Fargo and Company. To learn more how your company can engage in the Council’s Government Relations advocacy efforts, please contact Policy Manager Cornelious Burke.

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FLYING IN TO CLOSE AVIATION INDUSTRY WORKFORCE GAP

An expected surge in aviation maintenance jobs in the Bay Area in the next few years has industry leaders scrambling to find qualified workers. Employers like Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, FedEx and Southwest are already starting to feel the pinch from a shortage of workers to fill hundreds of middle-skills jobs that are expected to come open in a wide range of aviation-related jobs. In response, the Bay Area Council’s Workforce of the Future Committee this week (Aug. 7) convened a group of industry leaders to launch an Aviation Occupational Council focused on identifying the specifics jobs and partnering with Bay Area high schools and community colleges to build awareness about the opportunities in aircraft maintenance and other aviation-related jobs. The Aviation Occupational Council is just one of many similar councils we are forming to help meet demand in fields where there is a shortage of middle-skills workers. To engage in the Council’s Workforce of the Future efforts, and for more information on how to participate in occupational councils for your industry, please contact Senior Vice President Linda Bidrossian.

DCIM101GOPRO

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT: BACK TO SCHOOL AT ORACLE

If you visit Oracle headquarters in Redwood Shores, you’ll see a new building under construction at the north end of campus. In early 2018, Design Tech High School (d.tech) will move into this facility — its purpose-built home — and become the first public high school in the U.S. to be located on a tech company’s campus, while remaining fully autonomous. d.tech—a free public charter school— has occupied temporary spaces in existing education facilities since it was founded in 2014. In October 2015, Oracle CEO Safra Catz announced plans to construct the school a permanent home at the company’s headquarters. The new school facility was designed to meet the specialized needs of the school’s forward-thinking education model, which emphasizes extreme personalization and putting knowledge into action. The 64,000-square-foot, two-story building will also enable the school to grow to full capacity (550 students). The building is targeting LEED for Schools Gold with an efficient building form/envelope, a healthy interior environment, and low-impact landscaping. Visit Oracle’s d-tech to learn more.