Bay Area Council Blog: Workforce of the Future Archive

cybersecurity

A Bay Area-Europe Collaboration on Cybersecurity Education

EIT Digital and Bay Area Council member UC Berkeley have joined forces to launch Cybersecurity 360, the first professional education program of its kind, which will take place this October in Berkeley and in Munich, Germany. The program includes experts from both the U.S. and Europe, who will equip industry leaders to effectively address relevant cybersecurity issues in their management decisions.

This collaboration between EIT Digital and UC Berkeley Executive Education couldn’t be timelier, as organizations increasingly discover the price of online carelessness. According to the 2017 “Cost of cybercrime” study by Accenture and the Ponemon Institute, the average cost of online crime globally climbed to $11.7 million per organization, a 23 percent increase from 2016. Through the Cybersecurity 360 program, decision makers are able to obtain the required level of proficiency in cybersecurity to safeguard their organizations. Program details are available HERE.

AdvManu

Advanced Manufacturing: Gears are Turning

The Bay Area Council’s Workforce of the Future Committee convened its first Advanced Manufacturing Occupational Council on Wednesday, August 1 to address talent gaps in the region. The meeting addressed the need to build a larger supply of talented candidates through stronger marketing of the advanced manufacturing career path. Advanced manufacturing offers a variety of career growth opportunities that provide good wage earning capacity without the need for a four-year degree.

As the Bay Area economy continues to hum along at a fast pace, it is essential to maintain the economic advantage of advanced manufacturing. The Council will continue to expand membership engagement in this occupational council, and begin building lasting connections to talent throughout the Bay Area. For more information on the Workforce of the Future’s initiatives, please contact Linda Bidrossian, Senior Vice President, Public Policy.

Read the Economic Institute’s report on advanced manufacturing in the Bay Area>>

 

Construction_tariffs

New Tariffs to Escalate Construction Costs Impacting Bay Area’s Housing Production and Prices

Tariffs of 20% the Trump administration imposed last year on imports of Canadian softwood lumber, and more recent tariffs of 15% and 10% on steel and aluminum imports, are starting to impact the local economy – including construction and housing. Beyond land cost, the region’s high housing costs are primarily driven by a lack of inventory caused by resistance to development and fees imposed by local governments. The cost of construction materials can now be added as another obstacle to meeting the region’s housing goals – not the primary one, but an issue that’s additive and is likely to be significant.

Lumber accounts for the largest material cost of building homes. This may push builders to focus more on high-end homes where buyers can absorb the increased costs, instead of the low and middle income housing the region needs most. Higher steel prices are also starting to impact commercial high-rise construction. The marginal cost of materials, particularly when increases are double digit, can stall or stop a project. Some towers are being reduced in scale in order to lower costs, reducing the number of units produced. Residential projects have also been stopped or stalled as developers recalculate the higher costs and how design around them. The potential impact of tariffs is likely to grow with time, as more products (tools, fixtures, appliances) used in the building process or incorporated into new structures are added to the list. To engage in the Council’s housing advocacy work, please contact Senior Vice President of Policy Matt Regan.

 

 

MR_KTVU

Bay Area Cities Approve, Deny New Taxes on Business

A number of cities across the Bay Area have been pursuing initiatives to increase taxes on businesses with stated goals of generating revenue amid mounting housing affordability, transportation, and homelessness crises. This week, the City Councils of Mountain View and East Palo Alto passed measures going on November 2018 ballots to place a head tax and parcel tax, respectively, on businesses meeting certain parameters. Meanwhile, San Francisco and Cupertino withdrew their measures to increase business taxes following collaboration with affected companies.  In San Francisco, Supervisor Aaron Peskin replaced his ballot measure to tax gross receipts of ride-hailing and autonomous vehicle companies with a per-ride fee that will be introduced through state legislation. Cupertino agreed to delay consideration of a head tax measure until 2020 after more thorough planning is completed.

The Bay Area Council shares the concerns of these cities to find solutions to our region’s problems. However, we are concerned that in an attempt to be seen as taking action on a timely issue, cities are increasingly turning to taxing businesses without sufficient analysis or stakeholder engagement. Without a thoughtful process, cities risk reducing employment and wage growth, affecting employees and constraining the region’s economic success. The Bay Area’s housing and transportation problems are regional in nature and a myriad of heavy-handed taxes on businesses across multiple cities discourages the potential for a coordinated, regional strategy needed to solve these major challenges. The Bay Area Council has written letters and testified at numerous City Council meetings on these issues, and has offered to partner with City Councilmembers and their staff to assist with their analysis. We are encouraged by the actions of San Francisco and Cupertino to work with affected companies and take the time to analyze the impact of the proposed taxes before sending measures to voters for approval.

Select Committee Hearing Graphic

Modernizing The Master Plan: The Future of Higher Ed in California

On August 14, the Assembly Select Committee on the Master Plan for Higher Education in California, chaired by Assemblymember Berman (Palo Alto), will meet at the State Capitol to discuss higher education finance in California. The agenda can be viewed online.

The hearing will consist of two panels. The first panel will provide an overview of the budget process for community colleges, CSUs, and UCs, as well as discuss higher education finance challenges. Speakers on this panel will include the Legislative Analyst’s Office and Monica Lozano, President and CEO of College Futures Foundation.

The second panel will discuss California’s financial aid system. Speakers will include the Legislative Analyst’s Office, Lupita Cortez Alcalá, Executive Director of the California Student Aid Commission, and Robert Shireman, Senior Fellow with the Century Foundation.

In 1960, California developed a visionary plan for the future of higher education, known as the Master Plan. However, much has changed since 1960 – population growth, increased student diversity, a change in leading industries and their need for talent, as well as in the field of education itself. Technological advancements and the rise of new industries have altered student needs and boosted demand for higher education. As a result, our higher education system needs to respond to a host of issues never previously envisioned.

The Select Committee was established in March of last year to conduct a thorough review of the 1960 Master Plan. This hearing is the fifth of five planned hearings over the 2017-2018 Legislative Session and is the first step in a multi-year endeavor to ensure that the Master Plan reflects the needs of students in the 21st century economy.

For more information about the Select Committee for the Master Plan for Higher Education in California, as well as to watch previous hearings and view materials, please visit https://a24.asmdc.org/camasterplan.

veteran

Workforce Engaged as a Partner in the Region

Bay Area Council’s Workforce of the Future has been active on all fronts, continuing to participate in regional events centered on workforce development and inclusivity. On Wednesday, July 11, the Council along with member organizations San Francisco State University, San Jose State University and Sutter Health attended United Airline’s uIMPACT event hosted by San Francisco International Airport.  The event focused on providing health and career development resources for women in the aviation industry, important aspects of growing equitable opportunity.

On Friday, July 13, representatives from the University of California, San Francisco presented to medical assistant students at City College of San Francisco, while Sutter Health followed on July 20. Both UCSF and Sutter offered resume and interview advice, while describing their respective workplaces. Furthering the work to build a more inclusive economy, Council staff described efforts to open more career pathways for veterans in the region at Deloitte’s Veteran Summit hosted by LinkedIn. For more information on the Workforce of the Future’s initiatives, please contact Linda Bidrossian, Senior Vice President, Public Policy.

siebert

Member Spotlight: Siebert’s Gary Hall Appointed Chair of National Securities Oversight Board

The Bay Area Council congratulates Executive Committee member Gary Hall for his appointment as Chair of the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB). He is the first African-American to chair the MSRB Board of Directors, which serves as the principal regulator of the nation’s municipal securities market. Hall is Senior Managing Director, National Head of Investment Banking and equity partner at Siebert Cisneros Shank & Co., the largest minority-owned municipal finance and underwriting firm. At Siebert, Hall is responsible for managing all bankers and leading the firm’s execution strategy for business development with municipal bond underwriting, origination and financial advisory services nationwide.

Read the press release>>

brisbane bayland

Voters to Decide on Housing at Brisbane Baylands

The Bay Area would add 2,200 units of badly needed housing at an idle former industrial property located near transit under a proposal the Brisbane City Council approved this week that voters will now decide. The decision was a victory for the Bay Area Council and other groups that for years have been advocating for including housing as part of an overall project that would include 7 million square feet of commercial office space and significant open space and recreational amenities. The city previously had said it wouldn’t allow any housing on the 684-acre site, a position that drew strong condemnation from many housing advocates as the region confronts an epic housing shortage and affordability crisis. Whether voters in the small city will agree to add housing that would about double the size of Brisbane remains to be seen. UPC General Manager and Director of Development Jonathan Scharfman said “we are encouraged by Brisbane’s courageous decision to double the housing stock in their city.”

WorkingatSJC_PhotowithAlsaskaPlane600px

Careers Take Flight at Working@SJC

Amid San Jose’s warm and sunny weather Tuesday afternoon, roughly 70 job seekers, educators, and talent trainers on Tuesday (July 17) attended Working@SJC at Mineta San Jose International Airport (SJC) – an aviation career fair the Bay Area Council co-hosted with Alaska Airlines and SJC. The event attracted a wide array of job seekers ranging from aviation students and recent-college graduates to adults looking for new opportunities to transfer their skills.

Employers in attendance included Alaska Airlines, McGee Air Services, SJC, TSA and airport concessionaries, providing job seekers with a taste of the wide variety of career opportunities available at the airport and across the aviation industry. Attendees also had the unique chance to hear remarks from aviation trailblazers such as Secretary Norman Y. Mineta (via a recorded video), Alaska Airlines Regional Vice President Marilyn Romano and SJC’s Assistant Director of Aviation Judy Ross among other representatives from British Airways, Hainan, LinkedIn, and the FAA.

Tuesday’s event continues the Workforce of the Future’s efforts to connect local talent, regional educators and employers together to build and strengthen sustainable career pathways. For more information on how to get involved with the Workforce of the Future’s initiatives, contact Senior Vice President, Policy, Linda Bidrossian.

What's Next for the Tri-Valley? Tri-Valley Rising Report Rollout Event

New Report: Tri-Valley Rising 2018

There’s a valley in the Bay Area that has been leading the region in job creation over the past 12 years, but it’s not the valley you might be thinking of. A new report the Bay Area Council Economic Institute released Wednesday (July 18) examines the economic juggernaut that is the Tri-Valley, an area encompassing the cities of Danville, Dublin, Livermore, Pleasanton and San Ramon. Bay Area Council CEO Jim Wunderman led a discussion at the release event in Pleasanton with a panel of the Tri-Valley’s business and community leaders.

This isn’t a story, however, about competition with the other valley just across the Bay. It’s a story about connections, the Tri-Valley’s continuing ascendance as a technology and innovation powerhouseand its place at a key intersection of the growing Bay Area megaregion. With a GDP of $42 billion, the Tri-Valley economy is larger than the states of Wyoming and Vermont. The Tri-Valley’s 35 percent increase in jobs since 2006 exceeds San Francisco (31 percent), Silicon Valley (19 percent) and California (8 percent).

The report, which was produced in partnership with Innovation Tri-Valley Leadership Group, analyzes the incredible jobs and economic growth in the Tri-Valley, the factors that are fueling it—including the most educated workforce in the Bay Area—and the challenges that it faces as the region’s housing and traffic crises worsen. The report also highlights the important role of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories in creating a rich ecosystem of investment, entrepreneurs and talent around which the local innovation economy is thriving. It also highlights how employers like Bishop Ranch, which has launched its own technology accelerator and is piloting autonomous shuttles, are leading the charge in embracing the valley’s growing technology sector.
The report also highlights the Tri-Valley’s key role as a job and population center for the Northern California megaregion, and it provides recommendations to ensure the future sustainability of megaregional growth, such as a focus on transit-oriented development and creating new clusters of innovation.

Read Tri-Valley Rising 2018>>