Bay Area Council Blog: Workforce of the Future Archive

Stacey Abrams

STACEY ABRAMS TALKS WITH THE COUNCIL ON HER HISTORIC RUN FOR GEORGIA GOVERNOR

Stacey Abrams, whose historic run to become the first African American female governor in U.S history has captured national attention, was the featured guest this week at the Bay Area Council’s Gender Equity and Diversity Committee. Abrams is running to become governor of Georgia, where she served as the House Minority Leader, was the first woman to lead either party in the Georgia General Assembly, and was the first African American to lead in the House of Representatives. Abrams talked about her record of supporting legislation and policies that benefit working class families and promote strong reproductive healthcare. She also highlighted her goal of expanding Medicaid and promoting economic opportunity for all Georgians. Abrams in November will face the winner of a Republican primary runoff on July 24. The Council extends its thanks to member Greenberg Traurig for hosting our meeting.

The Gender Equity and Diversity Committee consists of Bay Area employers that are committed to advancing workplace cultures of equality within their companies and promoting more diverse leadership in corporate and political offices. To learn more about the committee, please contact Policy Director Emily Loper.

portland-ADU-1

COUNCIL’S THREE HOUSING BILLS ADVANCE

All three of the bills the Bay Area Council is sponsoring to address California’s housing crisis advanced this week. The Council is sponsoring more housing-related bills this session than any other organization in the state. SB 1227 by Sen. Nancy Skinner would allow student housing builders that meet certain affordability and other requirements to exceed local limits on the number of units allowed by 35 percent and exempt them from costly parking requirements. SB 831 by Sen. Bob Wieckowski would build on the huge success of his earlier legislation the Council sponsored in 2016 to make it faster, easier and less expensive for homeowners to add accessory dwelling units, aka granny units. SB 831 would eliminate most of the fees that add tens of thousands of dollars to each unit. SB 828 by Sen. Scott Wiener would strengthen accountability rules for cities to meet their local housing obligations. All three bills still have a couple legislative committee stops in the coming weeks. To find out how you can help in advocating for passage of these bills, please contact Senior Vice President Matt Regan.

rice

CONDOLEEZZA RICE, DAVID BROOKS & #METOO LEADERS WOW PACIFIC SUMMIT

The timing was ideal. As President Trump met with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore, guests at the Bay Area Council’s 2018 Pacific Summit on Tuesday were sitting down to hear from former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on what it all meant. In a lengthy conversation with Andrew Westergren, Senior Vice President and Global Head of Strategy and Corporate Development for Visa, in front of almost 200 top executives and other leaders, Rice candidly acknowledged the unconventional way in which the summit came together but also said it was worth a try given the failure of past efforts. Rice also gave her insights and analysis about the tumultuous G7 meeting in Canada, talked about U.S.-China relations as a trade war looms and provided insights into the motives and agenda of Russia President Vladimir Putin.

With national attention intensely focused on the issues of sexual harassment and discrimination, the timing was also perfect for a lively conservation with two leaders of the #MeToo movement. Janet Liang, President of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, moderated the discussion with Adama Iwu, Vice President of State Government and Community Relations for Visa, and Tina Tchen, former Chief of Staff to First Lady Michelle Obama and Partner at Buckley Sandler. Iwu was honored as a Time magazine Person of the Year for her work in founding We Said Enough, a group focused on exposing and changing a culture of sexual harassment and discrimination in the California legislature. Tchen is a leader of Time’s Up, which works to support women who have suffered sexual harassment or discrimination. The three gave their personal insights on the #MeToo movement and the cultural and institutional changes that must occur in order to end sexual harassment and discrimination.

The audience also was treated to sobering and humorous remarks from renowned New York Times columnist David Brooks. Brooks, in his comments and in a Q&A with McKinsey & Co. Senior Director and West Coast Regional Manager Kausik Rajgopal, talked about cultural and political divides in the U.S. and how a sense of community that has united people in the past has been replaced by tribalism, which by its nature divides people.

See photos of the Pacific Summit>>

The conversations continued later in the afternoon in smaller group discussions, with PwC Managing Partner Jeanette Calandra moderating a conversation with Tchen, UPS Northern California District President Rosemary Turner leading a discussion with Dr. Rice and TMG Partners leader Denise Pinkston guiding a talk with Brooks. Bay Area Council CEO Jim Wunderman opened the summit with insights about the Bay Area’s run of economic success and the housing and transportation challenges that threaten to pull the rug out from under it.

The Bay Area Council extends its thanks to Visionary sponsor Kaiser Permanente and the many other sponsors whose support is critical to funding our public policy and advocacy. See a full list of all Pacific Summit sponsors. Our thanks also to the Kohl Mansion for hosting us.

biotech

REGISTER TODAY: MAPPING BIOTECH’S FUTURE IN THE BAY AREA

The Bay Area Council Workforce of the Future program will be hosting a Veterans Employer Summit on June 20th. In partnership with Genentech Foundation and Swords to Plowshares, the event aims to strengthen veteran talent pipelines and connect employers with veteran initiatives. Employers will share best practices, while examining the most effective ways to hire, retain, and upskill veteran talent. Veterans serve a crucial role in filling high-demand positions, as the Bay Area builds a more inclusive and diverse workforce.

To register for the event, please click here. For more information or questions on the Workforce of the Future program, please contact Senior Vice President, Public Policy Linda Bidrossian.

harassment

2018 BACPoll: 4 of 10 Have Witnessed Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Almost four out of 10 Bay Area voters say they have witnessed sexual harassment in the workplace and a quarter say they’ve personally experienced sexual harassment on the job, according to results of the 2018 Bay Area Council Poll, which explored attitudes on a range of workplace issues.

Noticeable differences emerged among men and women. The poll found 41 percent of women say they have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace compared to just 11 percent of men. And 44 percent of women voters say they have witnessed bad behavior compared to 32 percent among men.

“The #MeToo movement has helped end the silence on sexual harassment and discrimination, but we have a lot of work to do to stamp it out completely,” said Jim Wunderman, President and CEO of the Bay Area Council. “The disparity between how men and women experience the issue is very concerning and shows that our work remains ahead of us.”

harassment

Still, an overwhelming 91 percent said they feel safe from sexual harassment at their current job and another 82 percent trust their employer to handle sexual harassment complaints appropriately, the poll found.

See the results>>

And while high numbers of both men and women say they feel safe from sexual harassment in their current job and trust that their employer will handle complaints in the right way, women are more likely than men to feel threatened and believe their complaints won’t be handled appropriately.

It is difficult to draw any conclusions from the results about the prevalence of sexual harassment within industries given the smaller sample size of each group. The poll found 16 percent of workers in the presumably male-dominated tech industry reported experiencing sexual harassment, the second lowest behind trade workers and much lower than the 35 percent in education and nonprofit fields.

On pay equity, the poll found 82 percent agree their employer attempts to pay fairly regardless of gender or ethnicity. There was only a small difference between the sexes, with 79 percent of women saying pay is handled fairly and 85 percent of men. Along ethnic lines, 88 percent of Latinos agree their employers attempt to pay fairly regardless of gender or ethnicity while 82 percent of whites and 81 percent of Asians believe that.

Findings among voters on several other workforce related questions include:

  • 33 percent expect a significant labor shortage in the next three years while 31 percent say there will be no shortage.
  • 66 percent have a favorable view of the business community
  • 83 percent say they are happy in their current job
  • 80 percent say they plan to remain in their current industry for at least the next five years

The 2018 Bay Area Council Poll, which was conducted online by Oakland-based public opinion research firm EMC Research from March 20 through April 3, surveyed 1,000 registered voters from around the nine-county Bay Area about a range of issues related to economic growth, housing and transportation, drought, education and workforce.

THE COCA-COLA FOUNDATION TO HELP BAY AREA YOUTH “TASTE THE FEELING”

The Bay Area Council’s Workforce of the Future Initiative received a big boost of support from the Coca-Cola Foundation with a year-long grant to advance the Council’s inclusive economy work with regional community-based organizations and employers to train and upskill youth of color. Despite booming economic growth in the Bay Area, certain communities, such as youth of color, have not been able to tap into this prosperity. This grant will address these disparities by further engaging youth of color in workforce development programs, beginning this week at SFO International Airport’s “Working at SFO: A Day of Career Exploration” on May 16th where over 400 students, parents, teachers, and trainers will learn and interview for aviation industry jobs. The Council is thrilled to be working with the Coca-Cola Foundation and its local North America Group to help give local youth opportunities to work with our member companies. For employers who want to participate in this effort, please contact Senior Vice President of Public Policy Linda Bidrossian to get involved.

BAC_logo_EconomicInstitute_RGB600

New Study Will Explore Opportunities for Expanding, Deepening Bay Area, Fresno, Central Valley Megaregion Connections

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – The Bay Area Council Economic Institute and Central Valley Community Foundation today announced the launch of an in-depth study to examine Fresno’s important role in the fast-emerging Northern California megaregion and how the arrival of high speed rail over the next decade will dramatically accelerate economic connections between Silicon Valley and the broader Bay Area and the state’s fifth largest city.

High speed rail is expected to shrink the time it takes to travel between the Bay Area and the Central Valley from more than three hours to less than one hour when it is scheduled to begin service in 2025 between Fresno and San Jose. That has huge implications for housing, transportation and workforce development across the megaregion and promises to bring exciting new economic opportunities to Fresno and other parts of the Central Valley. “Fresno and the broader Central Valley are key players in developing a broader megaregion strategy,” said Micah Weinberg, President of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute. “As county and other regional boundaries blur with the emergence of the megaregion, it’s imperative that we get a handle on what that future looks like and the infrastructure we’ll need to put in place to support it. We can act now to address these issues or confront chaos later. The Central Valley Community Foundation is an important and indispensable partner in making that happen.”

The study will focus in particular on strategies Fresno and other Central Valley cities can pursue to leverage high speed rail and other economic and demographic changes within the megaregion to boost their own economic prospects. While the 10 percent economic growth that Fresno has enjoyed since 2011 matches the national average, it has lagged cities like San Francisco and Los Angeles where the rate has reached 26 percent and 16 percent, respectively. Expanding the Central Valley’s participation in the megaregion economy, attracting new business and elevating its workforce to meet the needs of employers will also be a focus of the study.

“Improved economic and infrastructure connections between the Silicon Valley/Bay Area and the Central Valley is good, not just for our regions, but for the entire state,” said Ashley Swearengin, President and CEO of the Central Valley Community Foundation. “We are pleased to launch this work with the Bay Area Council and to explore meaningful ways to create new economic opportunities for Central Valley residents, businesses and communities and relieve pressure on the congested Bay Area.”

Swearingen kicked off the project on Friday, April 24 at a meeting in Fresno to identify the issues that would be addressed. The study is part of a much broader, long-term effort the Bay Area Council is leading to bring together top business, government and other civic leaders from the Bay Area, Central Valley, Sacramento and Monterey regions to develop a unified, integrated vision for guiding future planning for the megaregion around such issues as housing, transportation and workforce development.

Driving the Council’s intense focus on the megaregion is the Bay Area’s meteoric economic growth over the past decade combined with an historic housing shortage and affordability crisis. In search of more affordable housing, record numbers of Bay Area workers are being forced into longer and longer commutes from the Central Valley and Sacramento that are putting increasing pressure on an already overburdened and congested transportation system. At the same time, the Central Valley is eager to accelerate economic development opportunities that the megaregion offers and prepare its workforce.

The study with the Central Valley Community Foundation and support from Wells Fargo, UC Merced, Fresno State University, City of Fresno, and Lance Kashian & Co., is one of several activities the Council is leading to bring greater attention to megaregion planning. The Council is also working closely with Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg and the Greater Sacramento Economic Council on megaregion issues, including investing in better rail connections along the I-80 corridor and promoting the capitol city as a destination for businesses looking to start and expand outside the Bay Area.

The Council will be convening a series of meetings in 2018 to begin a dialogue with government, business, nonprofit and academic leaders on the future of the megaregion.

 

# # #

 

About the Bay Area Council Economic Institute

The Bay Area Council Economic Institute is a public-private partnership of business, labor, government and higher education that works to foster a competitive economy in California and the San Francisco Bay Area, including San Francisco, Oakland and Silicon Valley. The Economic Institute produces authoritative analyses on economic policy issues affecting the region and the state, including infrastructure, globalization, energy, science and governance, and mobilizes California and Bay Area leaders around targeted policy initiatives. Learn more at www.bayareaeconomy.org.

 

About the Central Valley Community Foundation

Central Valley Community Foundation has been a trusted partner in philanthropy in the Central Valley for more than 50 years. Our mission is to cultivate smart philanthropy, lead, and invest in solutions that build stronger communities. Learn more at www.centralvalleycf.org.

 

About the Bay Area Council

The Bay Area Council is a business-sponsored, public-policy advocacy organization for the nine-county Bay Area. The Council proactively advocates for a strong economy, a vital business environment, and a better quality of life for everyone who lives here. Founded in 1945, the Bay Area Council is widely respected by elected officials, policy makers and other civic leaders as the voice of Bay Area business. Today, more than 300 of the largest employers in the region support the Bay Area Council and offer their CEO or top executive as a member. Our members employ more than 4.43 million workers and have revenues of $1.94 trillion, worldwide. Learn more at www.bayareacouncil.org.

connections

New Report: Early Childhood Care and Education Key to Advancing Gender Equity in the Workplace

Workplace cultures that promote and even reward crazy long hours are doing more than causing baggy, blood-shot eyes and caffeine addictions. They’re also seriously undermining efforts to improve gender equity. That is among the findings of a new report the Bay Area Council Economic Institute released today (April 24) examining how long hours, inflexible scheduling, lack of access to quality early childhood education and childcare and other seemingly innocuous workplace practices can create an environment where women have less opportunity to advance and succeed. The report comes as the #MeToo and TIME’s Up movements are sparking a powerful national debate on gender equity and how both new and old workplace practices may be enabling a culture of inequity.

The report, in particular, explores how workplace policies and practices are often adopted piecemeal and in isolation from each other and how this fragmentation misses the crucial insight that gender equity, family-friendly policies, and early childhood care and education are intertwined. Employers who care about gender equity in the workplace, according to the report, need to understand the importance of high-quality childcare and early childhood education programs in the communities in which their businesses are based. Policymakers who care about providing universal early childhood care and education because of their impacts on child development and learning must also care about paid parental leave and other family-friendly workplace policies.

“We can’t begin to tackle unconscious bias, help women climb the corporate ladder, or close the pay gap until we develop policies and benefits that enable working women—and men—to reconcile the pervasive work-family conundrum” says Dr. Micah Weinberg, President of the Bay Area Council Economic Institute. “Long gone are the 1960s where only 20 percent of mothers worked outside the home and the American family included a male breadwinner and a stay-at-home mother. This anachronistic model no longer fits today’s economy and modern workforce where 70.5 percent of U.S. mothers with children under the age of 18 are participating in the labor force.”

Read Workplace Connections: Gender Equity, Family-Friendly Policies, and Early Childhood Care and Education>>

The report is the focus of a conference on Tuesday, April 24 hosted by Children’s Hospital Research Institute in Oakland that will bring together leaders from the business, public policy, early education and healthcare communities to discuss strategies to help employers better connect various workplace policies and practices around gender equity, early education and childcare. A separate report by the Rand Corporation will also be presented that looks at how investing early education can pay huge economic dividends.

The cost of not adopting a well-integrated set of gender equity, family-friendly and early education workplace practices and policies is considerable, for employers, for women, for men and families, according to the report. An alarming gender gap in median annual earnings of 19.5 percent continues, with inequalities becoming even more acute for mothers in the workforce. New mothers in their prime career-building years between the ages of 25 and 35 will experience the most significant earnings shock. The analysis shows that mothers are still assuming twice as much unpaid caregiving and household work than their male counterparts, causing stalled careers and lack of opportunity to advance in leadership positions.

The report offers a robust set of recommendations for addressing not only the lack of specific workplace policies and practices around gender equity and families and their connections to each other.

Modernizing employer work models that integrate family-friendly policies is critical to advancing gender equity in the workplace. Generous paid parental leave, more flexible work time, telecommuting, and providing access to affordable early childhood care and education are critical to working families and supporting mothers in the labor force. Important early childhood care and education strategies for employers outlined in the report include on-site childcare, subsidizing employee childcare expenses, providing referral resources, partnerships with neighboring businesses and more.

What Stakeholders Are Saying:

“Currently, the burden of paying for quality early childhood care and education falls squarely on the shoulders of parents and particularly women who are sometimes forced to leave the workforce because they can’t afford quality care.  Increased public and private sector investments in this area will not only help businesses retain qualified talent, they’ll be helping to foster tomorrow’s workforce, since quality interactions between teachers and young children are linked to increased acquisition of social and cognitive skills.”

Patricia Lozano, Executive Director, Early Edge California

“When we think about now people are perceived for taking advantage of the policies that we have, it really is a question of how normal is it. Do you become the outlier when you decide to take the full eight weeks parental leave as a male employee who didn’t give birth to the child? Or are you seen as somebody who’s leading the charge to role model the types of behaviors that leadership said they wanted to have at the firm? And I think that starts with leadership not just endorsing the policies, but taking advantage of it themselves, but also recognizing that when employees do that, it actually is a commitment to the type of employee that the firm wants. It’s not an outlier that shows lack of commitment.”

Keith Bevans, Partner, Chicago Global Head of Consultant Recruiting, Bain & Company

“We actually give moms and dads both 12 weeks of paid parental leave. We do believe that the father has a huge role to play in the child’s life, and we don’t want them to feel different than the mom. So we give them both that baby bonding time, and we’re seeing more and more dads take advantage of it. We also want moms to ease back into the workforce, and so we give them an additional 4 weeks of part-time so that they can get used to the new childcare arrangement that they have and feel comfortable leaving their baby.”

Nina McQueen, Vice President – Employee Experience & Global Benefits, LinkedIn

“We believe that it’s an employer’s responsibility in these times to put forward family-friendly policies that provide flexibility, that encourage men as well as women to become caregivers, and to allow people to work remotely at times if that works for the organization. So that with those kinds of policies in place, we’ll truly see women be able to do all the things that men have historically been able to do when it comes to making commitments to their companies and organizations.”

Jim Wunderman, President & CEO, Bay Area Council

stateeconomy

STATE ECONOMIC STRATEGY BILL ADVANCES

California is a global innovation and economic powerhouse, but currently does not have a statewide, comprehensive plan to grow its economy. That would change under legislation (AB 2596) that the Bay Area Council is sponsoring with the Greater Sacramento Economic Council and Valley Vision. AB 2596, authored by Assemblymembers Ken Cooley, Kevin Kiley and Sharon Quirk-Silva, would authorize the creation a statewide economic development plan to grow jobs, better coordinate economic activities across counties and regions and boost the state’s competitiveness. Having a clear, unified strategy can also help protect the state against future economic downturns and ensure that economic opportunities are being spread more evenly across the entire state. AB 2596 on Tuesday won unanimous approval by the Assembly Jobs, Economic Development and the Economy Committee and now heads to Assembly Appropriations. Just ahead of the vote, an OpEd by Council CEO Jim Wunderman and Greater Sacramento Economic Council CEO Barry Broome that ran in the Sacramento Bee argued for passage of the bill. To add your company to the growing list of our AB 2596 supporters, please contact Director for Government Relations Cornelious Burke.

Read the OpEd in support of AB 2596>>

megaregion report

Charting a Course for Megaregion Coordination

A rising economy, a massive housing shortage and growing traffic in the Bay Area are causing major changes across the Northern California megaregion that represent both opportunities and challenges. The Bay Area Council is spearheading an effort to bring together business, government, academic and civic leaders from across the megaregion on planning to embrace the former and minimize the latter. The Council last week traveled to Stockton where CEO Jim Wunderman presided over a meeting that included mayors from Stockton, Merced, Modesto and Livermore, leaders from key rail and regional planning organizations, and business and academic leaders.

In addition to hearing about the foundational research on the Northern California megaregion put together by the Bay Area Council Economic Institute and University of the Pacific, participants focused on the potential for future rail investments–in the ACE train and high speed rail–to spur economic development. The meeting, hosted by University of the Pacific in partnership with Valley Vision, was the first of a series of meetings the Council is convening across the megaregion in the coming months that will seek to produce a common policy advocacy agenda for megaregional stakeholders. To engage in the Bay Area Council’s work on the Northern California Megaregion, please contact Senior Vice President Michael Cunningham.