Bay Area Council Poll: The Pulse of the Bay

The Bay Area Council Poll is the only region-wide survey of its kind that provides a comprehensive and incisive look at the attitudes of Bay Area residents on the most topical and critical issues affecting the region. The Bay Area Council Poll provides a ranking of the region’s top issues, gauges what direction residents see the region heading overall and how they think the economy is performing. The poll also examines residents’ attitudes on a range of other key issues, including housing, transportation, water/drought. The results include breakdowns by county and, for certain subjects, by age and/or income level.

Day 1 (June 3): Growing Pessimism, Problems Driving Bay Area Residents Away

Growing pessimism among voters about the overall direction the Bay Area is heading has more and more people thinking about heading for the doors. The Bay Area Council Poll found that 46 percent of voters are ready to leave in the next few years, up from 40 percent last year and 34 percent in 2016. And once again, millennials are leading the charge for the doors with 52 percent saying they will be seeking greener pastures in the next few years, up from 46 percent in 2017.

Read the BACPoll Day 1 press release>>

Read the BACPoll Day 1 results>>

Day 2 (June 4): Paying to End Traffic

Bay Area voters are so frustrated with the region’s horrific traffic that they are willing to dig deep—really deep—into their pockets to solve the problem, according to the 2018 Bay Area Council Poll. The poll found that 42 percent of voters would pay from $3 up to $11 a day to eliminate traffic completely from their daily commute. With an estimated 3.4 million automobile and mass transit commuters in the region and 261 business days in the year, that hypothetically would translate into between $10.2 million and $37.4 million a day or up to $9.76 billion a year to do away with gridlock.

Read the BACPoll Day 2 press release>>

Read the BACPoll Day 2 results>>

Day 3 (June 6):  Frustration Over Housing Spikes

Frustration over the Bay Area’s housing crisis intensified over the past year as the number of voters in the 2018 Bay Area Council Poll who say it’s gotten much harder to find a place to live spiked. The poll found 53 percent saying it’s gotten much harder to find housing compared to 36 percent last year, while the overall number of voters who say it’s gotten much harder or somewhat harder jumped from 64 percent to 76 percent.

Read the BACPoll Day 3 press release>>

Read the BACPoll Day 3 results>>

Day 4 (June 7): Can Tech Solve Bay Area Traffic?

Bay Area voters are embracing new automobile and transportation technologies, from ride-hailing apps to responsive traffic signals, drones and electric and self-driving cars, to combat the region’s awful traffic, according to the 2018 Bay Area Council Poll.

Read the BACPoll Day 4 press release>>

Read the BACPoll Day 4 results>>

Day 5 (June 8): Workplace Sexual Harassment

Almost four out of 10 Bay Area voters say they have witnessed sexual harassment in the workplace and a quarter say they’ve personally experienced sexual harassment on the job, according to results of the 2018 Bay Area Council Poll, which explored attitudes on a range of workplace issues. Noticeable differences emerged among men and women.

Read the BACPoll Day 5 press release>>

Read the BACPoll Day 5 results>>

Day 6 (June 9): Dim Views of Immigration Crackdown, Federal Tax Reform

As the national debate on immigration rumbles – from banning or punishing so-called sanctuary cities, fortifying borders, ending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, restricting H-1B visas, to travel bans – Bay Area voters are drawing clear battle lines.

Read the BACPoll Day 6 press release>>

Read the BACPoll Day 6 results>>

Methodology

The 2018 Bay Area Council Poll, which was conducted online by national public opinion research firm EMC Research from March 20 through April 3, surveyed 1,000 registered voters from around the nine-county Bay Area about a range of issues related to economic growth, housing and transportation, drought, education and workforce. Respondents were invited by email to participate from among the 38 percent of registered voters with email addresses publicly available through county voter records. The final sample of respondents is weighted slightly, and is demographically and geographically representative of registered voters in the nine-county Bay Area. The poll does not include a margin of error because it is an online survey, which is a nonprobability sample. A nonprobability sample is one where not every individual in the population has an equal chance of being selected to participate.